The murder case involving Brendan Dassey, which was featured in the Netflix documentary Making a Murderer, has reached headlines again. Dassey, who was found guilty in 2005 of assisting his uncle with a murder in Wisconsin, appealed his charges and was expected to have his case heard by the U.S. Supreme Court. But, National Public Radio just announced that Dassey will no longer get his day in court.
 
Here’s why.
 
Back in 2005, when Dassey was only 16-years-old, he was interrogated by police after burned human remains were recovered at the Avery Salvage Yard. Those remains belonged to 25-year-old Teresa Halbach who had been hired to work at the yard to take photos of vehicles for magazines. Police also located her vehicle at the location along with multiple bloodstains inside. Dassey’s uncle, Steven Avery, was accused of raping and murdering the woman and Dassey was dragged into the mess as well.
The teen was questioned for nearly three hours after investigators came across the evidence and eventually got him to confess to assisting with the crime, including disposing of the body. No parent or adult was present and according to a previous report written by NPR, investigators “exploited the absence of such an adult by repeatedly suggesting that they were looking out for his interests.” But, if you have ever been interrogated or know someone who has, while police claim they are looking out for your benefit, they simply are only looking to get the answers to the questions they are asking. And they did.
Dassey’s criminal defense attorneys stated that “by the end of the interrogation, Brendan was so confused that he actually thought he was going to return to school after confessing to the murder.” It was also reported that Dassey, who was a “teenager of below average intellectual ability” at the time confessed, but did so after being deceived by officials. Naturally, his WI defense attorneys appealed the charges and for the last two years, “a lower court and a three-judge panel of an appeals court both found that Dassey’s confession was involuntary and that he should be released.”
Unfortunately for him, the full appeals court overturned their decision back in December and ruled that he should remain locked up for the remainder of his sentence. And on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that they would not be hearing Dassey’s appeal, although they neglected to provide any reasoning for why they made this decision. It can be assumed, however, that they felt that in his confession, he provided facts that linked him to the murder.
The most effective way of getting your criminal charges reduced or dismissed is by hiring a criminal defense attorney to represent your case.
Although this ruling was just announced, his Wisconsin defense attorneys intend to fight on his behalf to get him released from prison. And that is exactly why anyone facing a criminal charge in Wisconsin, whether it for a serious charge such as murder or possession of illegal drugs that only carries a minimum jail sentence, you always hire a Wisconsin criminal defense lawyer to represent you and protect your interests. While it isn’t clear what role Dassey played in the rape and murder of Halbach, he may have been coerced by police as suggested as officers of the law can be rather forceful during an interrogation.
 
You can expect more information from this case to be released as Dassey’s attorney continue to fight for justice.

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