As the demand for commercial truckers grows, the chief executive of the American Trucking Associations has devised a few ways to help fill the employment gap that is currently hindering the industry. For starters, Trucks.com reported that chief executive Chris Spear is pushing to recruit teenage truck drivers who have gone through the proper training and are qualified to operate these vehicles.
Spear says that teenagers ages 18 and up are deployed to other countries fighting to defend their own so why shouldn’t they be trusted to operate a commercial truck? He also said that he went to visit the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln and while on the captain’s deck, he “heard the captain instruct the helmsman: “20-degree right rudder.” He went on to say that it was an 18-year-old girl who had complied with those requests and she happened to be responsible for “driving a $4-billion warship.”
Basically, Spear is insinuating that if we are allowing our teens to take on roles such as those described above, certainly they can handle driving a commercial truck.
Obviously if an 18-year-old was hired to work in the trucking industry, they would need to complete a certain number of hours training, which Spear says would be 400 hours. He told the news outlet that right now, his top priority is to “recruit younger drivers” seeing that the “average age of the trucking workforce is 49.” He believes that if he can recruit teens who are not applying for college, he could potentially help reduce the driver shortage which is currently at 63,000.
Another option Spear proposed was to implement “a gas tax increase to fix roads” as poorly maintained roadways are a hazard to truck drivers. Not only do they increase the chances of a trucker engaging in an accident but also other motorists as well. The news source said that “Spear thinks a $1 trillion federal infrastructure spending plan proposed by President Trump will pass in 2019” and “he believes a 20-cent-per-gallon gasoline tax increase over four years would raise $340 billion.” Spear thinks higher fuel taxes are “the most efficient way to pay for road and bridge upkeep,” something the trucking industry has helped pay for.
While many auto manufacturers have already begun to create autonomous vehicles, Spear believes that this form of technology is something that would greatly benefit the trucking industry too.
The final suggestion Spear says will help the trucking industry is incorporating “safety technology for greater trucking industry productivity.” One example of the type of technology Spear believes would be beneficial to the trucking industry is the “connected vehicle technology that allows cars to talk with other cars and roadway infrastructure to avoid potential crashes and congestion.” Another thing Spear finds would be useful to the trucking industry is the automated driving assist and autonomous driving technologies. He says these features “could help drivers be safer, more efficient, more productive and less fatigued.”
While it appears the chief executive has many ideas that might help contribute to making the trucking industry more appealing which in return could fill the employee void that is currently there, only time will tell which of these suggestions will be implemented.
 
In the meantime, it is important that the truckers out there who are currently employed in the trucking industry are doing their due diligence to ensure they are operating their vehicle in a safe and cautious manner to avoid an accident. However, in the event you are a trucker who has been involved in a truck collision in Indiana and you want to be sure you are properly compensated for your injuries, it is best you consult with a Columbus, IN truck accident attorney.
The truck crash lawyers at Beck Rocker & Habig, PC located in Columbus, IN are some of the most experienced lawyers in the field and can help you or someone you know obtain the compensation they need if they have been injured in a collision with a truck.
 
You can reach Beck Rocker & Habig, PC at:
320 Franklin Street
Columbus, IN 47201
812-372-8858

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