<![CDATA[YUMA, Arizona. As temperatures soar across the country, so do reported deaths from heat stroke. We hear quite a bit about tragic hot car deaths when parents forget their children inside cars. But many more people intentionally leave their dogs in hot cars, putting their animals at risk. According to QZ, a dog can die in a hot cat in just six minutes. Over 64,000 incidents of animals being left in hot cars have been reported to the RSPCA between 2009 and 2018.
Dog owners may not realize how quickly their animal can suffer heat stroke in a hot car. Heat stroke can also be very serious. Only 50% of dogs survive heat stroke. To make matters even worse, it doesn’t have to be all that hot for dogs to suffer heat stroke. According to QZ, it only needs to be 70 degrees outside for a dog to experience heat stroke after only an hour in a car. Unlike humans, dogs don’t sweat. This is why heat stroke can be far deadlier for animals than for humans.
What can you do if you notice your dog overheating or if the day is hot? Bring a towel and water along and drape the towel over your dog’s back. Panting, heaving breathing, and walking unsteadily can all be signs that a dog is suffering from the early signs of heat stroke.
If you see a dog in a hot car, contact local authorities. If you believe the animal is in distress, gather witnesses who can corroborate your story and consider taking measures to remove the animals from the car. Remember that if you damage a window or a car in the process, the dog’s owner might try to sue you for damages, and unlike laws for humans that protect Good Samaritans, you might have a harder time defending yourself unless other witnesses around say they would have done the same thing to protect the animal. Still, if you are alone, you may still be able to take action. Most of us carry phones with video capacity. Take a quick video of the dog in distress and the surrounding area as proof that you were acting reasonably given the circumstances.
Dogs can also suffer injuries from hot pavement in the summer. According to PETA, on an 87 degree day, the asphalt can get as hot as 140 degrees, hot enough to burn your dog’s paws. It is better to walk your dog in the morning or evening when it is cooler and safer. However, if you hire a dog walker for midday strolls, make sure that they are taking precautions to protect your dog’s paws. If they don’t, they could be held liable for your dog’s injuries.
Summer can be a fun time to be outside with your animals, but make sure to take proper precautions. Schneider & Onofry, P.C. are personal injury lawyers in Yuma, Arizona who work with victims and families who have suffered damages due to another person or party’s negligence or neglect. If you’ve suffered a loss, you may have important rights under the law. Visit us at https://www.soarizonalaw.com/ to learn more.
Schneider & Onofry, P.C.
6024 E. 32nd St.
Yuma, AZ 85365
928-257-4887 Phone]]>

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *