Hours before Gov. Ron DeSantis’ moratorium was scheduled to expire, he announced that he would be extending it once again. Instead of expiring on September 1st, the eviction moratorium is now set to expire on October 1st, giving Floridians 30 more days to come up with a way to pay their landlords and avoid being evicted from their homes. Although the extension does give those who are facing a financial hardship some peace of mind knowing they cannot be forced out of their home just yet, that doesn’t mean their landlord cannot initiate the eviction process.

A few weeks back, Gov. DeSantis amended the moratorium to “suspend only the final action at the conclusion of an eviction proceeding.” Essentially, what this means is that a landlord is permitted to file for eviction but the final step in the process cannot be completed until the moratorium is lifted. Therefore, if a resident is unable to come up with a way to satisfy what is owed to their landlord or work out an agreement so that they can remain in their home, they will need to make other arrangements as their landlord will be legally permitted to carry out the eviction on October 1st.

The Orlando Sentinel reported that landlords in Broward, Palm Beach, and Miami-Dade counties have already filed 2,170 evictions between August 1st and August 27th. County Judge Eric Dubois also said that in Orange County, 471 evictions were filed after DeSantis amended the moratorium on August 1st and 372 were filed between April and July. The source also pointed out that the Orange and Seminole County Sheriff’s Offices served 48 evictions notices and 11 writs of possession, which is “the final step in removing a tenant after they’ve lost their case.” A spokeswoman for the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office told the source that the papers that were served were either for commercial evictions or residential evictions for matters that did not relate to unpaid rent.

The Orange County Sheriff’s Office also shared that the writs it served were processed prior to the moratorium taking effect.

Now, although landlords have been given the green light to begin eviction proceedings, and in some cases, carry out the entire process, judges appear to be taking into account the current circumstances tenants are facing. The news source says that in a case involving an Orlando resident, a judge denied the landlord’s request to evict her as she “lost her job back in March and has been unable to find any new work.” The woman also shared that she intended on applying for Orange County’s eviction diversion program that would assist her with paying her landlord the money she owed in rent.

 

Are you at risk of being evicted from your commercial or residential property in Orlando, FL?

 

If you have already received an eviction notice or are at risk of having your property foreclosed on, contact the Orlando, FL real estate lawyers at Legal Counsel P.A. The attorneys at Legal Counsel P.A. understand how stressful times are for tenants and residents and may be able to provide you with some assistance to either keep you in your home or buy you some additional time so that other arrangements can be made.

 

Legal Counsel P.A. has an office in Orlando which is located at:

 

189 S. Orange Avenue, Ste. 1800

Orlando, FL 32801

Phone: 407-395-2653

Website: www.legalcounselpa.com

Email: [email protected]  

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