Texas Mother Sought Out Physicians Who Would Perform Surgery on Her Son Who Wasn’t Sick

medical malpractice attorneys in Dallas

 

It is mother’s intuition to know when something is wrong with her child. Many mothers can sense when their kids aren’t feeling well or if something more is wrong. But, one Texas mother may have gone too far in her “ability” to sense whether something was wrong with her child, and it started the moment he was conceived.

When Kaylene Bowen, who now goes by Kaylene Bowen-Wright, first became pregnant with her son Christopher, she began to suspect something was wrong with her unborn baby. She would admit herself into the hospital claiming he was sick or that she had a severe fever. The father of Christopher, who had dated Bowen briefly and “unexpectedly impregnated,” felt the woman was simply trying to gain attention. Then in 2009, Christopher was born prematurely, and gradually, things began to take as steady turn south for the baby.

According to Star-Telegram, Christopher was seen 323 times at hospitals and pediatric centers in Dallas and Houston between 2009 and 2016. Aside from the numerous visits, he even underwent 13 major surgeries. But why? What was wrong with Christopher that required him to seek constant medical care and go through such invasive procedures?

According to Bowen, he was sick and dying, and she was willing to put him through any type of medical treatment to keep him alive. At one point, the mother alleged that her son was dying from a rare genetic disorder and later claimed he was dying from cancer. Between 2009 and 2016, Christopher was fitted for a feeding tube that fed directly into his small intestine, he developed life-threatening blood infections, and his mother even attempted to get his name placed on a lung transplant list. The young boy went through hospice care and even underwent surgery for a G-button resulting in his having to be placed on oxygen for 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

 

Christopher’s father attempted to gain custody of his son but was told he couldn’t care for him and his medical conditions.

After years of unnecessary medical treatments and undergoing invasive procedures, “medical staff determined that Christopher didn’t have cancer or many of the symptoms that Bowen had alleged.” Turns out, Bowen suffers from Munchausen syndrome, which is “a disorder in which a person exaggerates or creates medical symptoms to gain attention.” She even initiated a fundraiser where she collected $8,191 to help him and his family through this struggle “against a disease that is slowly ending his life.” Bowen was eventually arrested and is in Dallas County Jail in lieu of $150,000 bond.

 

So, how did Bowen manage to have her son receive all the medical care he did? After all, aren’t doctors responsible for testing someone before assuming they are suffering from a condition?

 

Apparently, Bowen would go from doctor to doctor until she could find those who agreed to perform the surgery as many of the tests that were performed to determine if he was sick showed nothing was wrong.

 

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A medical malpractice lawyer can help injured individuals file a lawsuit when harmed by a healthcare professional.

Can a medical malpractice lawsuit be filed against a doctor who performs an unnecessary procedure?

 

If you can prove that a doctor provided treatment or surgery without valid proof that is was necessary and it in harmed you in return, they may be held accountable for their negligence. There are many physicians who take pride in the work they do and follow the standard level of care laws, however, there are many others that simply want to get paid.

If you or a loved one was injured by a physician who didn’t abide by the standard level of care, speak with a Dallas medical malpractice lawyer to determine what steps you need to take to hold them liable.


By | 4:38 pm | Categories: Medical Malpractice News | 0 Comments

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