Do You Have A Police Brutality Case In Utah?

Racial profiling is when an officer uses a person’s race or ethnicity for suspecting they committed some sort of crime or infraction. Many officers use racial profiling when deciding who they think is breaking the law and who isn’t. Obviously, it is the duty of police to identify when criminal activity is occurring and to take the necessary action to get it to stop, however, it isn’t their responsibility to place minorities as their number one target when assessing who is guilty of a crime.

Anyone can be guilty of committing a crime and unfortunately, many minorities are the ones that suffer as they are wrongfully arrested, abused, and mistreated by officers of the law.

If you have become a victim to police brutality or a loved one was treated unethically by an officer, our police brutality attorneys in Utah know exactly what to do in order to combat against this wrongful and illegal treatment.

Yes, officers do have the right to apply force, but if it isn’t warranted they shouldn’t be applying any force at all, especially any that is classified as excessive.

 

Many Police Brutality Cases Arise Out of What Could Have Been a Simple Investigation

While many officers are commended for their bravery and dedication they put into their line of work, those who abuse their rights and the power they hold should be recognized for their wrongdoing when they apply more than a reasonable amount of force in a circumstance that calls for it. This often arises out of an investigation.

An officer can conduct an investigation in a number of different ways including:

  • Patrolling streets to uncover criminal activity they think is suspicious.
  • Stopping vehicles for traffic violations in hopes of identifying further evidence to incriminate a person.
  • Engage in undercover operations to uncover crimes.

However, “Each of these police tactics involves the exercise of a substantial amount of discretion-the police decide who they consider suspicious, which cars to tail, what conduct warrants further investigation, and which neighborhoods are ripe for enforcement activity” according to civilrights.org.

Sadly, many individuals whom officers “think” are guilty of committing a crime happen to be monitories and many of them who try and exercise their constitutional rights suffer the most.

 

What Makes It Difficult to Convict an Officer for Police Brutality?

The fact is, in majority of the police brutality cases that have occurred, only a few officers have actually faced a conviction for their actions. Although police departments claim that they investigate the death or excessive force incident, it doesn’t mean they are willing to incriminate one of their own.

For this reason, it can become a difficult task to identify when an officer of the law committed police brutality. Therefore, if you feel your rights weren’t respected and an officer mistreated or abused you, contact one of our Utah police brutality lawyers now. They can begin helping you in understand what forms of action can be taken and how they can help you.

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